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Temple University Hospital Earns ANCC Magnet Recognition

Temple University Hospital has achieved Magnet designation from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), considered the highest honor and form of recognition for nursing excellence. Only about 8 percent of U.S. health care organizations have achieved the honor of Magnet status.

“This is a tremendous accomplishment truly representing years of hard work and preparation,” said Verdi J. DiSesa, MD, MBA, President and CEO of Temple University Hospital, Chief Operating Officer of Temple University Health System, and Senior Vice Dean of Clinical Affairs at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. “It is recognition of the quality of the nursing care and dedication of the staff at Temple University Hospital, and puts us in elite company.”

Magnet designation distinguishes nursing departments within acute care hospitals, home care, and long-term care facilities which have a professional and progressive atmosphere in which staff demonstrate interprofessional collaboration and decision-making, innovations in professional nursing practice, and nursing excellence. It is also a benchmark of patient care.

“Since we began this journey over five years ago, I reinforced the need to develop and set structures where nursing excellence can be demonstrated. Our Temple nurses define and demonstrate nursing excellence in every aspect of their professional nursing practice and patient care delivery at Temple University Hospital,” said Elizabeth J. Craig, DNP, CRNP, FACHE, Chief Nurse Executive and Vice President of Patient Services at Temple University Hospital. “The Magnet Commission has validated that we have exceeded the standards and benchmarks of nursing excellence, making a difference within our community. Magnet at Temple signifies a relentless commitment to our patients, colleagues, and each other. For our patients and the community, Magnet assures the highest quality care.”

The Magnet Recognition Program first evaluates health care institutions in 14 areas before conducting an on-site survey over a period of three days. Representatives from the ANCC visited Temple University Hospital and its affiliated entities, including Episcopal and Northeastern campuses and the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit housed at Jeanes Hospital.

Magnet status lasts for four years, at which time organizations must reapply and be reviewed again.

Date Published: Wednesday, January 16, 2019